Axis Gallery is happy to announce the Juror's Choice Awards for our 15th National Juried Competition. Juror Marcela Pardo Ariza has chosen the work of Hasler Gomez, Elise Weber, and Robert Núñez to each receive the distinction and an award of $200 for the work they have exhibited in the Competition.

Tangled Embrace

Zachary-Jordan Angeles
Tangled Embrace
Charcoal, Ink, and Acrylic
Calm through me.

Zachary-Jordan Angeles
Calm through me.
Charcoal, Ink, and Acrylic
I am your voice too.

Zachary-Jordan Angeles
I am your voice too.
Charcoal, Ink, and Acrylic
Walking in an Exaggerated Manner with Bruce Nauman, 2018

Cody Arnall
Walking in an Exaggerated Manner with Bruce Nauman, 2018
video
CAUTION PATRIARCHY DISRUPTION ZONE, 2020

Jenny Balisle
CAUTION PATRIARCHY DISRUPTION ZONE, 2020
acrylic
Child And Goat, 2020

David Bartlett
Child And Goat, 2020
Digital Photograph/Inkjet Print
Connections, 2018

Stephanie Baugh
Connections, 2018
collage on panel
Portrait: Courtney with Firmament, 2018

Wesley Bell-Miller
Portrait: Courtney with Firmament, 2018
Acrylics on Canvas
Pages from my notebook: I give thanks, 2020

Elizabeth Bennett
Pages from my notebook: I give thanks, 2020
diptych collage
Don’t Rape # 17, 2020

Jennifer Buehner-Varley
Don’t Rape # 17, 2020
Acrylic on Balsa with Poplar Cradle
Together, 2020

Deziree Dizon
Together, 2020
Pastel on board
Taking Care Of (being taken care of), 2018

Carmel Dor
Taking Care Of (being taken care of), 2018
Oil on canvas
Creation of Coleus, 2018

Carmel Dor
Creation of Coleus, 2018
Oil on canvas
Daniel photographed by Thomas/Thomas photographed by Daniel, 2018

Daniel Georges & Thomas Simpfendoerfer
Daniel photographed by Thomas/Thomas photographed by Daniel, 2018
Two archival pigment prints
UNTITLED, 2020

Hasler Gomez
UNTITLED, 2020
inkjet print in artist frame
Compa_eros, 2020

Cheryl L. Guerrero
Compa_eros, 2020
Digital photography printed on fine art matte
Touch in the Time of COVID, 2020

Wesley Haack
Touch in the Time of COVID, 2020
Digitally Altered Photography
Man Love, 2020

Pamela Hartvig
Man Love, 2020
Oil on Birch
Dwelling in the Southwest, 2020

William Ishmael
Dwelling in the Southwest, 2020
Ceramic
61520, 2020

Jim Jacobs
61520, 2020
cherry, metal
51120, 2020

Jim Jacobs
51120, 2020
maple, metal
A Partial History (Book 3), 2019

Marina Kassianidou
A Partial History (Book 3), 2019
Archival inkjet prints on luster paper
Girlfriends, 2018

Stela Mandel
Girlfriends, 2018
Oil Bar on Canvas
Girlfriends #2, 2018

Stela Mandel
Girlfriends #2, 2018
Oil Bar on Canvas
Sisters, 2018

Marianne McCraney
Sisters, 2018
oil on canvas
Keeping, 2019

Robert Nunez
Keeping, 2019
Photograph mounted on a VHS tape
Being Social, 2019

Robert Nunez
Being Social, 2019
Framed Photograph
Lockdown View, 2020

Gwendolyn Pryor
Lockdown View, 2020
Print
Lockdown View at Night, 2020

Gwendolyn Pryor
Lockdown View at Night, 2020
Print
Untitled, 2018

Lauren Rayburn
Untitled, 2018
oils
Lauren A. Toomer

Unrest, 2020
Lauren A. Toomer
Oil on canvas
Social Distanced, 2020

G. E. Vogt
Social Distanced, 2020

The Space Between, 2020

Elise Weber
The Space Between, 2020
Oil on Canvas
Wisdom Fist, 2019

Nathan Wong
Wisdom Fist, 2019
two color silkscreen, one color lithograph, edition of 20
Untitled, 2020

Seongmin Yoo
Untitled, 2020
Basket vines and handcrafted needles

 

Con Cariño, Tenderly

See installation views here

Back in early February, I was honored to be invited by the AXIS gallery team as a juror for their 15th National Exhibition. I proposed an exhibition on touch, intimacy and unintentional solitude in a time of oversaturated digital interaction. Our circumstances have drastically shifted; we are in the midst of a massive and poorly managed health crisis and facing historic uprisings against police brutality, needed structural change and Black Liberation. This time makes us reconsider who we are, where we are and how we want to be in relation to ourselves and others. It makes us question how we care for each other, and how to organize collectively to insist on urgent and long overdue individual and systemic changes. We invite you into this space to hold a moment for you to think about how you want to redirect this moment and energy moving forward. What does this collective moment mean to you? How can you empower and uplift others? How should this moment be represented in history?

The artists in the exhibition bring us to some of the places we are currently experiencing physically, emotionally, individually and collectively. We go from touch and intimacy, or lack thereof, reconsiderations of the body in domestic and public spaces. The work of Zachary-Jordan Angeles honors the Black Lives Matter movement and LGBTQAI+ communities, through tender portraits of touch and tenderness. Elizabeth Bennett reminds us of the often unspoken gratitude of daily interactions and moments of care from strangers, this gesture takes particular importance as we honor folks who are doing visible and invisible labor in the front lines. Jennifer Buehner-Varley calls attention to domestic aesthetics and the importance of consent, particularly in a time of ongoing shelter-in-place. Carmel Dor depicts the symbiotic relationship with the natural world through delicate gestures and interaction with other species. Jim Jacobs' work reminds us of the potential of quotidian objects and their anthropomorphic qualities. Robert Nunez’s work reveals our now acute awareness of physical distance between each other. 

There is nostalgia for touch, physical gestures of care, collective spaces and a recognition of our own positionality. With that, this is an invitation to dive into the relatability of some of those feelings and the urgent need for change towards a future that is inclusive and caring of every single body. I am grateful to the artists, as always, for being vulnerable and sharing their work publicly, during this time. We must continue to create, and use these tools to understand even the most unprecedented times. Let’s continue to show up for each other fiercely and sometimes also tenderly. Let’s not ever forget the importance and the politics of care for one another.

By Marcela Pardo Ariza

Marcela Pardo Ariza (b. Bogotá, Colombia) is a visual artist and curator that explores transhistorical and intergenerational kinship, alternate forms of representation through photography and site-specific installations. Marcela has organized public programs and exhibitions at Southern Exposure, CTRL SHFT Collective, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, Noroof Gallery, Knockdown Center and Root Division. Ariza is the recipient of the Tosa Studio Award 2017, an Alternative Exposure grant (2019, 2020), a Murphy & Cadogan Contemporary Art Award, a finalist for the 2017 San Francisco Artist Award and an Alternative Exposure grantee (2018, 2019). Ariza holds an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute, is a co-founder of Art Handlxrs and a former member of the Curatorial Council at Southern Exposure.